Cellulose Insulation

Cellulose Insulation

Blown cellulose insulation is an environmentally friendly solution

Learn why cellulose insulation is the ideal option for your home.

If you're looking for an effective, environmentally friendly insulation option for your home, cellulose insulation is a great choice. Cellulose insulation is made from old newspapers and other waste paper that would otherwise be dumped in landfills.

Cellulose insulation is blown into attics or wall cavities to provide a thick layer of insulation that provides the R-value your home needs. Dr. Energy Saver specializes in cellulose insulation, and we can help you get the right services for your needs! If you're interested in cellulose insulation for your home, contact us today to get started with a free estimate.

How cellulose insulation works

Cellulose insulation is made from recycled materials that are ground into a fluffy, lightweight material with insulation value as high as R-4 per in. The insulation is treated with a nontoxic borate solution that gives the material a Class 1 fire safety rating (the highest available), while also making it resistant to mold and insects.

Cellulose insulation is installed in your home by being blown into the cavity that needs insulation, be it an open attic or an enclosed wall. One of the best features of cellulose insulation is that it can usually be installed over the exisiting insulation, saving time and money.

The three types of cellulose insulation

Cellulose Insulation

Blown cellulose insulation is an affordable solution that can dramatically improve comfort and energy efficiency.

Cellulose insulation offers impressive versatility in terms of application possibilities. Although cellulose forms a much denser and more effective insulation layer than fiberglass, it should still be installed after air sealing is completed. If you choose cellulose insulation for your home, there are several different types available:

  • Loose-fill or blown cellulose: Loose fill cellulose is frequently used to insulate unfinished attics. It's installed by feeding cellulose into a hopper and blower unit that supplies shredded cellulose through a long hose, where it is blown into the attic. For this reason, this insulation method is often called blown-in cellulose. Blown cellulose installs over the existing insulation and raises the R-value to recommended levels.
  • Dense-pack cellulose: Dense-pack cellulose is used to insulate wall cavities and other enclosed spaces. This application technique calls for 2-in.-diameter access holes to be drilled into the cavities, so that a small application nozzle can be inserted to inject the insulation. This method completely fills the space with the maximum amount of insulation, as the name suggests. Access holes are plugged when the job is complete.
  • Wet spray cellulose: Wet spray cellulose is used to insulate open stud bays in new construction. Adding water and (in some cases) a binder compound to the dry cellulose enables the sprayed-on insulation to stick to itself and other building components. This method offers air sealing and insulation in one step.

Get quality cellulose insulation for your home today

If you have insufficient insulation in your attic or walls, cellulose insulation from Dr. Energy Saver could be the right answer for your home. Our insulation experts will evaluate your home and recommend the right cellulose insulation services for your needs. Contact us today to get started with a free estimate on cellulose insulation for your home!

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